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Internet Support

If you’re having problems, we’re here to help. Below are links to solutions to several common questions about Internet and Email. If you have questions about VTelevision, click here.

If you do not see something that matches the issue you are experiencing, you can always contact us directly by email, this webform, or phone at (802) 885-9000.

We will never send you an email asking for your account information. This is a popular way that hackers try to get your account information called “phishing”. There is no reason that we will ever ask for your account information. If you do reply to one of these emails, contact us to reset your password.

Universal Public Service Notice

Email Support

There are many ways to do this; however the easiest is to use our web-based email client. You can access the webmail system at roundcube.vermontel.net.

Recently changes were made to our outbound mail server so it aggressively filters mail being sent with an IP Address that originates overseas. Any mail sent from a vermontel.net address coming from an overseas IP Address is automatically blocked. If you are a customer traveling for business or leisure and will need the ability to send email from your vermontel.net email account, please contact Tech Support at 888-242-7584 so that your block may be lifted. It’s much like notifying your bank when you are traveling so they can allow your card to work while you are away. We are more than happy to make this change for our customers, but the servers can’t be left open due to the major increase in spamming.

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This information is required by your email client in order to operate properly. For the correct values to all of these questions and more, please visit Basic Internet Settings.

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  1. Press Settings.
  2. Go to the Mail, Contacts, Calendars section
  3. Add account
  4. Choose Other
  5. Add mail account
  6. Fill in your account information

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We have several guides available for the programs listed below. If you do not find one that you like you can always find many more guides online by using a search engine such as Google or Yahoo.

Microsoft Outlook Express
Microsoft Outlook
Apple Mail
Mozilla Thunderbird
Windows Live Mail

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Note: This is not a full user manual for the entire spam filter. This is a simple guide to utilizing the most important parts of the filter.

Notification

Every day Roaring Penguin sends VTel users an Anti-Spam notification. This notification shows what has been quarantined in the last 24 hours, since the last notification. By default the notification only includes a maximum of 40 entries. There are several different formats this notification can be sent in. The format can be changed by going to http://spam.vermontel.net/, signing in with your email address and password, then going to Preferences → Notification, select your desired format from the Notification Type drop-down → then hit the [Submit Changes] button at the bottom.

Notification Types

HTML with Links: This is the most used format because it has links to let you manipulate the quarantined emails. At the bottom of this format is a link to the quarantine, which will require your email address and password to log in.

Pending Pessages

  • Date: The date and time the email was quarantined
  • Subject: This is a view of the email’s subject line.
  • Country: This is the Country where the email originates from
  • Score: This is the spam score the filter has given the email. The score is based on a variety of different things. The filter looks at each email for traditional, widely-used spam techniques, and scores it accordingly. By default the minimum spam score is set to 5, so anything below that is not considered spam.
  • Action: This is what you would like to do with the email:
    • Accept: This selection pushes the email from the quarantine to your inbox. It does not create a rule.
    • Reject: This selection rejects the message, removing it from your quarantine but not allowing it into your inbox. This does not create a rule.
    • Always Allow Sender: This will always allow this sender to your email.
    • Always Block Sender: This will always block the sender. Not allowing them into your email.

Brief Notification: This is plain text with a link to the Quarantine at the top. The links on the Sender line will open a new email addressed to that sender.

Detailed Notification: This is plain text with a link to the Quarantine at the top. The links on the Sender line will open a new email addressed to that sender.

Detailed Notification

Clickable Webform: This format is very useful, but it may not work in every email Client. This format is just like the HTML with links format, but it also includes an ‘Action Column’, which is useful for making many selections at once. You can make every selection you’d like using the ‘Action’ column, and when you are satisfied with all the changes click the ‘Submit’ button at the bottom, which submits all your selections at once.

Clickable Webform

Accessing the Quarantine

To log in to your quarantine go to http://spam.vermontel.net/ and use you email address and password to log in. Be sure to enable cookies on your web-browser if they are not already enabled. When you log in the page it opens on is your quarantine page: b

Quarantine

The quarantine page is very similar to the HTML email notification, except that there are a couple more selections that can be made here that can be found in Status and Action column. The additional selection are as follows:

  • Always Allow Domain: Always allowing a domain is different than allowing a sender. Let’s take the email address ‘bobby34@emailprovider.net’ for example. If you always allowed that sender it would allow bobby34 into your inbox every time. If you were to always allow the domain for bobby34@emailprovider.net that would allow emailprover.net through every time, so any email address ending in @emailprovider.net would be allowed into your inbox. This is useful for such things like weather alerts from weather.com.
  • Reject and Report Phish/Fraud: This selection can be made if you see an email that you believe to be particularly malicious. If reported Roaring Penguin will take a look at the email and the sender and act accordingly.
  • Block Domain: The opposite of allowing a domain.
  • Side Bar:
    • Pending: These are the emails that are quarantined and awaiting your decision.
    • Note: you do not have to make a selection for every entry.
    • Spam: This is a list of 100% verified spam emails. The scores on these emails usually exceed 2000.
    • Non-Spam: This is a list of emails that were quarantined due to various reasons, but are not typical spam. These usually score under 10, but over 5.
    • All: All the emails.
    • Specific Incident: Using an Incident ID (every email is given one, can be found by clicking on the time it was quarantined) you can bring up a specific incident to see what happened with it.
    • Search: This searches the entire quarantine. Even emails that were quarantined before.
  • Reject/Accept/ and Do Noting to all: At the top of the quarantine page there are 3 icons: a blue one with a question mark in it, a green one with a check mark, and a red one with an x in it. The blue on sets all emails on the page you are viewing (50 emails) to do nothing. The green one sets them all to Accept, and the red one sets them all to Reject. Also there is a ‘Reject All as Spam’ button that will reject all t he emails and train them as spam.
  • Note: Don’t forget to click ‘Submit Changes’ on either the top or bottom of the page to finalize your selections.
  • Links on the Quarantine Page:
    • Date: Clicking the time in the date column will bring you into the Incident Screen on that specific email. From here you can see a number of things including why the filter scored it like it did.
    • Subject: Clicking this will bring you into a preview of the actual email. Any external images will be blocked, but if the email includes text you will be able to see it here.
    • From: Clicking on the Sender’s username will bring you into a screen which allows you to create a rule for that specific sender. Clicking on the sender’s domain will do the same, but the rule is referring to the sender’s domain, not the sender itself. Also the sender’s country of origin is listed here in the form of a flag. If you hover your mouse over the flag it will tell you what country it belongs to.
    • Relay: Clicking on this will give you information about the origin of the specific email.

Configuring your Spam Filter

Home

Very similar to the Quarantine screen, but from here you can add email addresses and domains to your Accept and Reject list by manually typing them in. At the top of the page is the ‘Accept and Always Reject List’. Simply click on the drop-down and select what you’d like to do, either ‘Always Accept’ or ‘Always Reject’, then type the email address or domain in the field to the right of the drop-down and click ‘Add’.

Note: You can view every rule created by going to ‘Rules’ (from the black bar at the top of the screen) and selecting either ‘Senders’ or ‘Domains’ from the left-hand menu, whichever one corresponds to the rule you are looking for.

Rules

This section is everything to do with the rules you have added or want to add. There are many options on the left-hand side of this section, but we are going to cover the ones you are most likely to use.

  • Senders: This is a list of all the rules that have been created for your filter regarding specific senders. You can filter by the Action from the ‘Action’ drop-down. Or by entering the specific email address in the ‘Sender’ field. If you type an address in the field titles ‘Enter a specific Sender’s email address you can create a rule for that address. Just search it then choose the desired Action. You can also click the small ‘Show Changes’ link which will list the changes that have been made in chronological order, so you can see when you’ve made certain changes.
  • Domains: This list is exactly like the sender list but it refers to rules created for domains specifically. Can be manipulated the same way the Sender Section can be.
  • Countries: From here you can create and view rules regarding entire countries. Example: if we wanted to create a rule that made it difficult for emails coming from Qatar to get into our inbox we would set it up like this or something similar: Under Country select Qatar. QA (the abbreviation for Qatar) will appear in the small square to the left of the drop-down where you selected the country, then put a numerical value into the Score field. Whatever number you put here (negatives work as well) will be added or subtracted from the email’s score. By default the filter automatically rejects any email scoring over 2000, so lets put 2000 in the Score field. The comment field can be left empty, it is optional, but it can be useful to remind ourselves why we created the rule. For this one I put ‘Country rule for Qatar’.
  • Custom Rules: Possibly the most useful section of the Rules. From here you can create specific customized rules. For example the email account I am using to write this gets many emails with the subject line ‘EMPLOYMENT OFFER’. It’s clearly bogus and we don’t want to see it anymore, but the sender is never the same and neither is the domain making it impossible to just block the sender or domain. So this is what we do: Select ‘Subject’ for the ‘Field’ column. The ‘Field’ Column represents what field of the email the rule is made to look at. In this case it’s the subject line. For relation we can select ‘is’ because the subject line is EMPLOYMENT OFFER and never changes. For ‘Data’ we will type ‘employment offer’ (it’s not case sensitive). Put 2000 into the score, since we know the filter automatically rejects anything scoring above 2000. We leave expiry blank because it’s a permanent rule, and we can leave comment empty if we want. Then click ‘Add Rule’ and the rule will appear. Now any email that comes in where the subject line is ‘employment offer’ will have 2000 added to the score, automatically rejecting it.
    • Relation Field
      • Contain: When the ‘Data’ is contained in the Field. For example: if there is an offensive word in a subject line, but the subject line is not always the same you could make the ‘Field’ the subject line and put the offensive word in data. You would set the ‘Relation’ as contains because the word is contained in the subject line each time.
      • Starts With: The field starts with whatever is in the ‘Data’ field.
      • Ends With: The field ends with whatever is in the ‘Data’ field.
      • Does not Contain: The field does not contain whatever is in the ‘Data’ field.
      • Is: The field is exactly what is in the ‘Data’ field.

Preferences

This section is where most of the filter settings are made. Again I will point out the most-used parts of this section.

  • Preferences: Some miscellaneous settings. Some useful ones are ‘Number of entries per page’ which is how many emails are displayed on each page of the quarantine. The default is 50 and it can be set all the way up to 1000.
    • ‘Help level’ and ‘Hide help by Default’: There is a help menu in the upper-right hand corner that is minimized by default. If you set ‘Hide help by Default’ to no then submit your change, you will see a nice little help menu show up in most sections of the spam filter.
  • Opt in/Out: If you simply do not want spam filtering enabled you can Opt out, or opt back in if you’d like to reverse that rule. Without spam filtering you will receive every email addressed to you, regardless of who sends it.
  • Quarantine Settings: The first part of this section titled ‘Filter Settings’ will be where most selections are made here. Some useful ones:
    • Automatically reject messages scoring more than this amount: By default it is set to 2000, so anything that scores over 2000 is automatically rejected by the spam filter.
    • Auto-reject messages scoring more than this amount without creating an incident: By default set to 10,000. Anything that scores over 10,000 is automatically rejected and no incident is created.
    • Spam Threshold: By default set to 5. Anything scoring above a 5 is marked as spam. The lower the score you use here, the stricter the filter will be.
  • Notification: This section is everything to do with the notification email that gets sent out daily. This includes the frequency that it gets sent, what is contained in it, and wheat address it gets sent to. Here are some useful settings in this section:
    • Do not include messages scoring above this threshold in notifications: By default this is set to 2000, which means that any message that was quarantined and scored over 2000 will not be included in the daily notification, but it will still be quarantined. You can set this number to anything you’d like.
    • Notification Times: From here you can check off what time of the day and what day of the week the notification is sent. Note: you can select multiple times.
    • Send Pending Notification Now: At the bottom of this page is a button that will send the pending notification email.

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Modem Support

We have two different types of DSL service. Please choose the appropriate troubleshooting guide. If you are unsure of which DSL service you have there is an easy way to determine this. Simply look at your DSL modem. If the modem was made by Nortel then you have the Nortel One Meg Modem, if it was not made by Nortel then please view our troubleshooting guide for all other DSL lines.

  1. Does the modem have power? If there is no power to the modem check both ends of the power cord. If this does not resolve the problem, verify that the electrical outlet is working properly by plugging in another device, such as a clock or portable radio. If the electrical outlet is working properly contact our office for a replacement modem.
  2. Reboot your modem. Always a good place to begin. You can reboot your modem by unplugging the power wall from the socket. Wait ten seconds and plug it back in. Remember to wait approximately 60 seconds after you plug the modem back in to give the DSL modem time to connect to the VTel network.
  3. Check status lights. Checking the status lights on the front of the modem. It has six lights across the front:
    1. The first light is the power light. If this is off but the modem has power it is probably just a defective LED and not a serious problem.
    2. The second light shows communications between the modem and the VTel network. This is off when no communications are happening. Red when data is being received from the VTel network, Green when data is being sent from your premise and Orange when data is being both sent and received.
    3. The third light is the DSL “sync” light. This indicates the status of the DSL line.
    • Off – This could be several things, such as a bad LED, the modem is still performing starting up, or the modem is bad. Start by waiting another 15 seconds. If the LED does not come on or start blinking contact our office to obtain a replacement modem.
    • Red – The modem does not detect a signal from the VTel network. Verify that the line cord is firmly attached in the back of the modem and to the wall jack. You can also verify that the telephone outlet is operating properly by attaching a corded telephone and making sure that you have dial tone and can make phone calls. If the phone jack is fine, and the problem persists, contact our office for assistance.
    • Orange – The modem sees the VTel network; however is unable to establish a stable link. Verify that the line cord is firmly attached in the back of the modem and to the wall jack. You can also verify that the telephone outlet is operating properly by attaching a corded telephone and making sure that you have dial tone and can make phone calls. If the phone jack is fine, and the problem persists, contact our office for assistance.
    • Solid Green, with occasional Red or Orange flickers – The modem is establishing a link to the VTel network; however the link is not stable and is dropping. Wait approximately 60 seconds. If you are still experiencing problems contact our office for assistance.
    • Solid Green – The modem has a stable link with the VTel office. If you are having connection problems you may want to try rebooting your computer and check your Ethernet connection or networking equipment.
  4. The fourth light indicates traffic passing between the modem and your computer or networking equipment. Red means traffic going one direction. Green is traffic flowing in the other direction. Orange indicates traffic in both directions. No LED means no traffic is flowing.
  5. The fifth light is the Ethernet collision light. This light should be off. If there is any illumination then it indicates a possible problem between your computer and the modem. The symptoms of an Ethernet collision problem are usually slow throughput or intermittent connection. Ethernet collisions can be caused by: a bad modem, a bad Ethernet cable between your computer or network equipment and the modem, or a problem with the computer or networking equipment. It is usually best to replace the Ethernet cable first. If that does not resolve the collision issue then replace the modem or the computer network adapter or other networking equipment.
  6. The sixth light is the Ethernet connection LED. A green LED indicates that the modem is seeing a good connection from the computer or networking equipment through the Ethernet cable. This light only looks in one direction. If you suspect an Ethernet connectivity problem, it is possible that the other direction may still have an issue. If this light is off, check the Ethernet cord and computer equipment. If the problem persists replace the modem and Ethernet cable. If problem still continues then the problem is likely the computer or networking equipment.

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  1. Verify that the DSL modem has power by verifying that the power LED on the front of the DSL modem is illuminated. You may want to test the electrical outlet by plugging a different device into the outlet, such as a clock or radio.
  2. Reboot your computer and any other networking equipment (ie: routers, switches, printers, etc.).
  3. Reboot the DSL modem by unplugging the modem from electrical power, waiting ten seconds, and then plugging the modem back in.
  4. If you have other networking equipment try plugging your computer directly into the DSL modem. If you can get onto the Internet then likely the problem is somewhere on your local network.
  5. Verify that the DSL link is active. You can check this by looking at the WAN or ADSL LED on the front of the modem. If the light is solid the link is active and functioning. If the light is flashing then the link is trying to come up. Give the modem approximately 60 seconds. If the light does not go solid then verify that the telephone cord is firmly attached in the back of the modem and the wall outlet.
  6. Temporarily disable any third-party firewall or antivirus software. We sometimes find that these utilities cause connectivity problems. If you disable the third-party software and your connection starts working properly you may want to contact the third-party software vendor for support.

Manuals and Guides

  • BEC Modem User Guide
  • Setup & Secure your BEC DSL Modem Wireless Connection: There are two different versions of BEC DSL modems that we currently have in use. Each of these modems has a slightly different interface and method for configuring your wireless connection. Fortunately there is an easy way to determine which modem you have:
    • Version 1: If your BEC DSL modem has a toggle-switch power button that is located on the back-left side of the modem (when the modem is viewed from the front where the status lights are located), then you should follow of the setup guide.
    • Version 2: If your BEC DSL modem has a square power button that is located on the back-right side of the modem (when the modem is viewed from the front where the status lights are located), then you should follow of the setup guide.

If your BEC DSL modem has a toggle-switch power button that is located on the back-left side of the modem (when the modem is viewed from the front where the status lights are located), then you should follow this setup guide. If not, consult version 2.

    1. Open your Internet browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Chrome, etc.).
    2. In the address bar enter 192.168.1.254.
    3. Enter admin for both the username and password when prompted.
    4. You should see the screen below. Click the Configuration link.
      Enable Wireless on the BEC Modem - Step 4
    5. In the Configuration menu select LAN.
      Enable Wireless on the BEC Modem - Step 5
    6. In the LAN menu select Wireless.
      Enable Wireless on the BEC Modem - Step 6
    7. Click the radio button next to Enable for WLAN Service. Change the channel to 8. You can also scan the channel usage and pick an unused channel. Click the Apply button.
      Enable Wireless on the BEC Modem - Step 7
    8. Click the SAVE CONFIG button at the bottom of the page.
      Enable Wireless on the BEC Modem - Step 8
    9. Click the Apply button.
      Enable Wireless on the BEC Modem - Step 9
    10. After saving is complete click the RESTART button at the bottom of the page.
      Enable Wireless on the BEC Modem - Step 10
    11. Make sure that the radio button next to Current Settings is checked and click the Restart button.
      Enable Wireless on the BEC Modem - Step 11
    12. Once the modem is done counting down your wireless should be working.

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If your BEC DSL modem has a square power button that is located on the back-right side of the modem (when the modem is viewed from the front where the status lights are located), then you should follow this setup guide. If not, consult version 1.

  1. Open your Internet browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Chrome, etc.).
  2. In the address bar enter 192.168.1.254
  3. Enter admin for both the username and password when prompted.
  4. You should see the screen below. Click the Configuration link.
    Setup and Secure Your BEC Wireless Modem - Step 4
  5. In the Configuration menu select LAN.
    Setup and Secure Your BEC Wireless Modem - Step 5
  6. In the LAN menu select Wireless.
    Setup and Secure Your BEC Wireless Modem - Step 6
  7. Make the following settings:
    1. WLAN Service = Enable.
    2. Channel ID = Channel 9
  8. Click the Apply button.
    Setup and Secure Your BEC Wireless Modem - Step 8
  9. In the LAN menu select Wireless Security.
    Setup and Secure Your BEC Wireless Modem - Step 9
  10. Select WPA2-PSK in the drop-down menu next to Security Mode.
  11. Enter your desired wireless password where it says WPA Shared Key.
  12. Click the Apply button.
  13. Click on Save Config at the bottom of the page.
    Setup and Secure Your BEC Wireless Modem - Step 13
  14. Click on the Apply button.
    Setup and Secure Your BEC Wireless Modem - Step 14
  15. Click the OK button.
    Setup and Secure Your BEC Wireless Modem - Step 15

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  1. Open your Internet browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Chrome, etc.).
  2. In the address bar enter 192.168.1.254.
  3. Enter admin for both the username and password when prompted.
  4. You should see the screen below. Click the Configuration link.
    WEP Encryption Setup - Step 4
  5. In the Configuration menu select LAN.
    WEP Encryption Setup - Step 5
  6. In the LAN menu select Wireless Security.
    WEP Encryption Setup - Step 6
  7. Select WEP from the drop-down list.
    WEP Encryption Setup - Step 7
  8. Select ASCII from the down-down list as shown below.
    WEP Encryption Setup - Step 8
  9. Depending on how secure you want your connection you can select either WEP64 for a 5-character password or WEP128 for a 13 character password. Choose your password length and enter your desired password into the Key 1 box. Click Apply.
    WEP Encryption Setup - Step 9
  10. Click on SAVE CONFIG at the bottom of the page and then click the Apply button.
  11. Once the modem is done saving your configuration your wireless network will be secured. The next time you try to connect to the wireless network you will be prompted to enter the password that you entered earlier.

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  1. Open your Internet browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Chrome, etc.).
  2. In the address bar enter 192.168.1.254.
  3. Enter admin for both the username and password when prompted.
  4. You should see the screen below. Click the Configuration link.
    WPA1 Encryption Setup - Step 4
  5. In the Configuration menu select LAN.
    WPA1 Encryption Setup - Step 5
  6. In the LAN menu select Wireless Security.
    WPA1 Encryption Setup - Step 6
  7. Select WPA1 Pre-Shared Key from the drop-down list.
    WPA1 Encryption Setup - Step 7
  8. Enter your desired password into the WPA Shared Key box. The password must be between 8 and 63 characters.
    WPA1 Encryption Setup - Step 8
  9. Select Apply. Click on SAVE CONFIG at the bottom of the page and then click Apply.
  10. Once the modem is done saving the configuration your wireless network will be secured. The next time you try to connect to the wireless network you will be prompted for the password that you entered earlier.

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  1. Open your Internet browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Chrome, etc.).
  2. In the address bar enter 192.168.1.254.
  3. Enter admin for both the username and password when prompted.
  4. You should see the screen below. Click the Configuration link.
    WPA2 Encryption Setup - Step 4
  5. In the Configuration menu select LAN.
    WPA2 Encryption Setup - Step 5
  6. In the LAN menu select Wireless Security.
    WPA2 Encryption Setup - Step 6
  7. Select WPA1 Pre-Shared Key from the drop-down list.
    WPA2 Encryption Setup - Step 7
  8. Enter your desired password into the WPA Shared Key box. The password must be between 8 and 63 characters.
  9. Select Apply. Click on SAVE CONFIG at the bottom of the page and then click Apply.
  10. Once the modem is done saving the configuration your wireless network will be secured. The next time you try to connect to the wireless network you will be prompted for the password that you entered earlier.

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Internet Support

We have already programmed your new wireless modem/router for you!

Attach the power adapter to the POWER slot on the back of the Actiontec.

Plug the modem/router into a power outlet and wait for a few minutes while it configures.

DSL Customers:

  • Connect the phone cable (usually green) from the PHONE port on the Actiontec to the wall jack.
  • Connect the Ethernet cable (large plastic end) from any of the 4 yellow LAN ports to any computer that is NOT wireless.
  • DO NOT PLUG INTO THE WAN PORT

When connected properly the lights to Power, DSL, Internet, Wireless and any LAN port that is in use will be on and green

Fiber to the Home Customers:

  • Connect from the grey WAN port on the Actiontec to the wall mounted Ethernet Jack with the Ethernet cable provided.
  • Any computers that need to be hard wired will connect to any of the 4 Yellow LAN ports.
  • DO NOT CONNECT ANY COMPUTERS DIRECT TO THE WAN PORT ON THE ACTIONTEC.

When connected properly the lights to Power, WAN Ethernet, Internet, wireless and any LAN port that is in use will be on and green.

Your Wireless Password is printed on a label on the bottom of the router and is all CAPITAL LETTERS.  If you happen to reset your router this is also default wireless password is for the device.

Internet Tech Support: 1-802-885-9002

Toll free: 1-888-242-7584

Shipping Address: 354 River Street Springfield, VT 05156

NOTICE: If your device has been shipped to you we have covered the shipping cost for this device. Customers are responsible for the cost of the return shipping of any old devices. 
Also note that there is a Hold Fee placed on all accounts until the old device is received at our office. 

  1. Phone Port – This port is used to connect the telephone line for DSL Customers.
  2. Ethernet Ports – These ports are used to connect non-wireless capable devices such as Desktop computers or Cell Phone signal boosters.
  3. WAN Port – This port is used to connect to the Fiber (FTTH) box on the side of the house. This port is not used by DSL Customers.
  4. Power Adapter – This port is used to connect the A/C Power Adapter included with this device.
 

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Domain Name Servers, sometimes referred to as DNS Servers, are the servers responsible for telling your computer how to get to a specific location on the Internet when you type in something like www.vermontel.net in your web browser or other Internet application. Typically computers and networking equipment request a Primary and Secondary DNS server. At VTel we operate several DNS servers, both to handle the number of requests and to provide redundancy. By using the following two entries your equipment will be load-balanced to our entire set of DNS servers: 

Primary DNS Server: 216.66.108.26
Secondary DNS Server: 216.66.108.34

Domain Name is generally used by programs and networking equipment to determine what provider’s network they are directly connected to. The domain name to use on our network is: vermontel.net

POP3 Mail Server is the server that allows your email software to download your messages from our incoming mail servers to your computer, or other device. POP3 stands for Post Office Protocol version 3. Our VTel POP3 Mail server address is: pop.vermontel.net

IMAP Mail Server is the server that allows your email software to remotely access your messages without downloading them from our computer. If you intend to leave messages on our server we generally recommend the use of IMAP instead of POP3. IMAP was designed for this functionality whereas POP3 only partially supports this ability. IMAP stands for Internet Message Access Protocol. Our VTel IMAP server address is: imap.vermontel.net

SMTP Mail Server is the server that your email software connects to when you send a message. You write your message and when you click send your email software connects to our SMTP server and relays the message. Our SMTP server then delivers the message to the appropriate mail server out on the Internet. SMTP stands for Simple Mail Transport Protocol; however it is often easier to think of it as Send Mail To People. Our VTel SMTP server address is: smtp.vermontel.net

Username is the short identification name that you chose when you signed up for service. Usernames are at least 2 — but no more than 16 — characters long, all lowercase, and cannot begin with a number.

Email Address is your VTel username followed by the ‘@’ symbol and then the appropriate Domain Name (in most cases this will be vermontel.net). For example if your username was jdoe then your email address would be jdoe@vermontel.net

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Please be sure to plug your router into a surge protector. If VTel’s Internet router or other equipment in your home is destroyed because you didn’t use a surge protector you will be billed the replacement cost as follows:

  • VTel owned routers: $150
  • DVR Set Top Box: $190
  • Wifi or Standard Set Top Box: $115

You must use a surge protector and not a power strip. Electric surge protectors are available at Best Buy, Staples, Walmart and many hardware and drug stores. Please also refer to the High Speed Internet Agreement.

A surge protector functions like a power strip; it gives the user the ability to plug in multiple electronic devices, but it also serves another very important function. A surge protector will also protect your electronic devices from a power spike. In order to tell the difference between a power strip and a surge protector, you have to look for an electric rating measured in Joules, as well as the maximum voltage it can take from a power spike. If you find those numbers either on the box it came in or on the device itself it is a surge protector, if it has no such values it is a power strip and will not protect your devices from a power spike. Visually they can appear very similar. A good way to verify that you have a surge protector and not just a power strip is to look for a RESET button on the device. All surge protectors provide a RESET button that will need to be pressed if the device experiences an electrical event. Power strips do not provide a RESET button.

 

If you have questions please feel free to contact Technical Support at (802) 885-9002.

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